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Engage your students with the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, to illustrate themes and concepts in any discipline.

Scenes from the American Revolution:The Good, The Bad and Ugly

  • Goals and Objectives

    Slide Notes

    Goal:  Students will understand that George Washington’s leadership ability enabled him to recover from a crushing defeat and go on to victory. Objectives: 1)Students will be able to explain the significance of the Battle of Long Island. 2)Students will be able to identify how the Battle of Long Island and subsequent events illustrated George Washington’s leadership abilities. 
    Grades 7-8 Social Studies Core Curriculum, United States and New York State History, Unit Three: A Nation is Created, Section IV, Military and Political Aspects of the Revolution, http://www.p12.nysed.gov/ciai/socst/pub/sscore1.pdf (page 49).

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  • What Washington Predicted

    Slide Notes

    After he drove the British army from Boston on March 17, 1776, George Washington thought that British General Howe would attack New York so he  marched his army south to New York City. 

    http://www.britishbattles.com/long-island.htm

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  • The British Advance

    Slide Notes

    Washington was right! General Howe wanted to capture New York City so that he could easily march troops south to Philadelphia or north to New England. So began the Battle of Long Island on August 27, 1776.

    http://www.britishbattles.com/long-island.htm

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  • The Battle of Long Island

    Slide Notes

    The Battle of Long Island was fought in Brooklyn Heights, New York. Washington’s troops fought bravely but suffered 1500 casualties.  Thankfully a heavy fog allowed the Americans to escape from Brooklyn by crossing the East River into Manhattan. Poor George. The Colonial untrained troops were no match for the British who were professional soldiers. After Washington lost the Battle of Long Island, he continued fighting the British as he fled New York, marching through New Jersey and finally stopping in Pennsylvania. 

    General Washington ordering the disembarkation

    http://www.britishbattles.com/long-island.htm

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  • Washington in Pennsylvania

    Slide Notes

    Chased to Pennsylvania, Washington and his troops  were very depressed in the Fall and Winter of 1776.  Washington knew his men were upset they had not yet scored a major victory on the battlefield against the British Army . He also knew that the men’s enlistments would be up soon and they would leave. He needed to motivate his men and come up with a plan to win a battle. So Washington ordered the reading of Thomas Paine’s The Crisis Number 1 to his troops in December of 1776 ."These are the times that try men's souls: The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis shrink from the service of his country; but he that stands it NOW, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman." 

    Thomas Paine http://www.weapon-blog.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/Thomas_Paine1.jpg

     

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  • Washington’s Brave Plan

    Slide Notes

    Under the cover of darkness on December 25, 1776 with his men pumped from the reading of The Crisis Washington secretly moved 2400 men across the Delaware River from Pennsylvania to New Jersey. Washington was ready on this snowy, frigid night to attack the unsuspecting Hessians.  Colonel Rall the Hessian commander had not built fortifications or sent out patrols.  He was not afraid of the Americans and actually called them "country clowns." Washington planned for an early morning attack on December 26. He knew the Hessians had celebrated Christmas on the evening of December 25, so he attacked when they were tired and probably not feeling well from all the celebrating.

    Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze, American, 1816-1868

    George Washington Crossing the Delaware, 1851
    Oil on Canvas; 12 2/5 x 21 1/4 in. (378.5 x 647.7 cm)
    Gift of John S. Kennedy, 1897 (97.34)

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  • Conclusion

    Slide Notes

    This victory at Trenton showed George Washington's ability to rally his troops and plan a strategically successful attack on the enemy. 

     

     

    Charles J. Peterson, Washington at the Battle of Trenton, 1810.

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