User Menu

MFA for Educators

Engage your students with the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, to illustrate themes and concepts in any discipline.

Homeschool (9-11) PM Wearable Art: Diadems

  • Athena

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Statue of Athena Parthenos (the Virgin Goddess)

    2nd or 3rd century A.D.

    Dimensions

    Overall: 154 cm, 232.7 kg (60 5/8 in., 513 lb.) Stone (Dry mounted recessed 3 3/8" deep into Concrete base): 69.9 x 55.9 x 51.4 cm (27 1/2 x 22 x 20 1/4 in.) Mount (Concrete base dry mounted onto wooden pallet): 22.9 x 105.4 x 89.5 cm (9 x 41 1/2 x 35 1/4 in.)

    Medium

    Marble from Mt. Pentelikon near Athens

    Classification

    Sculpture

    Accession Number

    1980.196

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Classical Roman Gallery - 213 More Info

    Description

    Roman-period replica of the cult statue that once stood within the Parthenon on the Athenian Acropolis, a chryselephantine (gold and ivory) colossal statue designed by the master sculptor Phidias and . dedicated in 438 B.C. The goddess wears a helmet on which are remains of Pegasoi on either side flanking a sphinx of which only the paws remain; above the visor are parts of protomes, probably deer; griffins in relief on the cheek pieces. Curls frame the face, tresses fall on her shoulders. Gorgon on aegis which is edged by snakes; snakes encircle her waist forming knot at the center. Condition: The head and neck were carved of a lighter marble than the rest of the figure. Joins are confirmed by matching curls above the left shoulder and the hair below the helmet and on back of aegis. Restored areas include a small part of the left eyelid, tip of the nose and left nostril, much of the lower lip and the end of the chin, and the curl of hair on the right side of her neck, including a small portion of the curved lower end of the helmet. There are no restorations on the body. Traces of paint remain on the lower curls on Athena's left shoulder. Ancient iron pegs are visible in the troughs of the arms, along with larger dowel holes for fitting the arms and the weight they supported. Some surfaces were carefully cleaned long ago; others preserve good root marks. Scientific Analysis: Harvard Lab No. HI752: Isotope ratios - delta13C +2.76 / delta18O -8.63, Attribution - Pentelikon, Justification - Sparkling, fine grained marble.

    Multimedia

  • Egyptian Funerary Crown

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Funerary crown

    possibly from the 4th century A.D.

    Dimensions

    Height x diameter: 9 x 20 cm (3 9/16 x 7 7/8 in.)

    Medium

    Papyrus

    Classification

    Tomb equipment, Mummy Trappings

    Accession Number

    50.3788

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Egyptian Funerary Arts Gallery (Mummies) - 109 More Info

    Description

    Funerary crown made of papyrus strips and containing a thin bronze sheet in the front, overlaid with an openwork weave.

    Multimedia

  • Crown

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Funerary crown

    4th century B.C.

    Dimensions

    Length x width: 32 x 4 cm (12 5/8 x 1 9/16)

    Medium

    Gold

    Classification

    Jewelry / Adornment

    Accession Number

    95.87

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Gems and Jewelry of the Ancient Mediterranean More Info

    Description

    A thin band of gold with attached laurel leaves and small flowers. The central ornament is an archaic mask of a gorgon. Each end of the band is a conventionalized peacock, standing full front, with spread tail. Torn in several places.

    Multimedia

  • King Menkaura

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Colossal statue of King Menkaura (Mycerinus)

    2490–2472 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Overall: 243.8 x 115.6 x 83.8 cm (96 x 45 1/2 x 33 in.) Other (head): 37.5 x 47cm (14 3/4 x 18 1/2in.)

    Medium

    Travertine (Egyptian alabaster)

    Classification

    Sculpture

    Accession Number

    09.204

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Ancient Egyptian Large Sculpture (Mycerinus) - 108 More Info

    Description

    This colossal statue is one of the largest sculptures of the Pyramid Age. With a height of nearly 2.35 meters (8 feet), as restored, it features King Menkaura, who built the smallest of the three pyramids at Giza. His clothing and headgear clearly identify him as the ruler. He wears a wraparound kilt with a central projection, a garment worn only by kings until the end of the Old Kingdom. On his head is a royal kerchief, called a nemes. A cobra, known as a ureaus, is at his brow. This serpent was considered a deity and charged with protecting the king by wrapping itself around the royal brow and spitting its poisonous venom at the king's enemies. Menkaura's long straight beard, another symbol of royalty, was attached by means of a strap that was once painted on the statue's head. His right hand is clasped around a folded cloth, the ends of which extend onto his thigh. The king's expression is one of regal composure and supreme control. With its slightly bulging eyes, bulbous nose, painted moustache (now barely visible), set mouth with pouting lower lip and firm chin, the face is distinctive, but whether or not it represents a true portrait of Menkaura can never be known. This is the face of a mature adult, although neither face nor body displays any signs of aging. It has often been remarked that the head is unusually small for the king's body. Whatever the artist's reason for doing this, it certainly emphasizes the breadth of the figure's torso and enhances its image as omnipotent king. This statue sat in the deep niche at the back of Menkaura's Pyramid Temple located at the base of the eastern face of his pyramid until, for reasons unknown, it was deliberately destroyed. In January 1907, George Reisner found fragments from the shoulder and torso in a pit in that room and the large fragment comprising the hands, legs, and throne base in an adjacent corridor. Two months later, while excavating what proved to be a robber's trench nearby, Reisner found the head in nearly perfect condition. The different installations of Menkaura atthe MFA reflect the changing aesthetics of the Museum audience. When the fragments first arrived in the Museum, only the head and leg were exhibited. Two years later, additional torso pieces were added, and an abstract restoration of the missing torso elements was attempted. In 1925, at Reisner's request, the well-known watercolorist and artist for the expedition, Joseph Lindon Smith, sculpted the torso and buttocks in a more naturalistic manner. The restoration that visitors see today was accomplished in 1935 by Smith, assisted by Museum School student Charles Muskavitch.

    Multimedia

  • Headdress

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Woman's headdress

    Dimensions

    .30 x .23

    Classification

    Jewelry / Adornment

    Accession Number

    19.659.1

    Collections
    Asia More Info

    Description

    Multimedia