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MFA for Educators

Engage your students with the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, to illustrate themes and concepts in any discipline.

Grade 3 MFA Field Trip

  • Mask (bwoom)

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Mask (bwoom)

    20th century

    Dimensions

    33.02 cm (13 in.)

    Medium

    Wood, copper, beads, cloth, shells, and seeds

    Classification

    Masks

    Accession Number

    1994.414

    Collections
    Africa and Oceania More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Hip mask

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Hip mask

    late 17th century

    Edo peoples

    Dimensions

    16.51 cm (6 1/2 in.)

    Medium

    Ivory, copper, and ebony

    Classification

    Unclassified

    Accession Number

    L-R 227.1997

    Collections
    Africa and Oceania More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Mask (deangle)

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Mask (deangle)

    20th century

    Dimensions

    41.9 cm (16 1/2 in.)

    Medium

    Wood, vegetable fiber, shell

    Classification

    Masks

    Accession Number

    1994.420

    Collections
    Africa and Oceania More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • The God Ganesha Seated with his...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    The God Ganesha seated with his wife

    About second half of the 10th century A.D.

    Dimensions

    66 x 36 x 16 cm (26 x 14 3/16 x 6 5/16 in. )

    Medium

    Sandstone

    Classification

    Sculpture

    Accession Number

    25.442

    Collections
    Asia More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Ganesha with His Consorts

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Ganesha with His Consorts

    early 11th century

    Dimensions

    Overall (object): 105.1 x 68.6 x 33 cm (41 3/8 x 27 x 13 in.) Overall (including base and wooden skid): 352 kg (776 lb.) Overall (base): 13.2 x 76 x 40.5 cm (5 3/16 x 29 15/16 x 15 15/16 in.) Case (Reinforced wooden pedestal/ three sided outer skirt): 137.2 x 91.4 x 55.9 cm (54 x 36 x 22 in.)

    Medium

    Sandstone

    Classification

    Sculpture

    Accession Number

    1989.312

    Collections
    Asia
    On View
    176 More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Relief of Ptolemy I offering to...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Relief of Ptolemy I offering to Hathor

    305–282 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Overall: 36 x 128 x 18cm (14 3/16 x 50 3/8 x 7 1/16in.) Other (Height x length x D): 128cm (50 3/8in.) Block (painted wooden base ): 149.5 x 136.2 x 115.6 cm (58 7/8 x 53 5/8 x 45 1/2 in.) Case (plex-bonnet): 38.7 x 136.2 x 24.1 cm (15 1/4 x 53 5/8 x 9 1/2 in.)

    Medium

    Limestone

    Classification

    Architectural elements, Doors, jambs, lintels

    Accession Number

    89.559

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Egyptian Late Period Gallery - 216 More Info

    Description

    Ptolemy I on right with raised hands holding a bowl of flaming incense; Hathor on left holding a papyrus-scepter; hieroglyphs on each side and top. [Alternate Text:] The founder of the Ptolemaic Dynasty is shown offering incense to the goddess in a small brazier complete with two incense pellets and a wisp of smoke. Hathor holds a wand in the shape of a papyrus stalk. The word for papyrus also meant 'green', which was therefore written with a hieroglyph representing a papyrus plant. Thus, in the incomplete inscription behind the goddess's head, the papyrus hieroglyph (crossed by a cobra, used as a phonetic sign) appears as part of the writing of 'great-green', the Egyptian name for the Mediterranean Sea. Early Ptolemaic art continued the style developed in the preceding 29th and 30th Dynasties, in its soft modeling of the fleshy bodies, the elegant precision of details, and the somewhat mannered refinement of such features as the long curving fingers.

    Multimedia

  • Relief of Akhenaten as a sphinx

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Relief of Akhenaten as a sphinx

    1349–1336 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Height x width x depth: 51 x 105.5 x 5.2 cm (20 1/16 x 41 9/16 x 2 1/16 in.)

    Medium

    Limestone

    Classification

    Architectural elements, Relief

    Accession Number

    64.1944

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Egyptian New Kingdom Gallery - 210 More Info

    Description

    Although Akhenaten's religious reforms purged Egyptian art of many of its most familiar manifestations, the king remained fond of the sphinx and often had himself depicted as that fantastic creature - part man, part lion. In Old Kingdom times, the Great Sphinx at Giza probably stood for the king presenting offerings to the sun god, while in the Eighteenth Dynasty the mighty monument was reinterpreted as the sun god Horemakhet, or Horus in the Horizon. Its impeccable solar credentials therefore made the sphinx an appropriate image for Akhenaten at el-Amarna, the city he called Akhetaten, "Horizon of the Sun Disk." This relief was one of a pair flanking a temple doorway. The sphinx on it rests on a plinth, suggesting that it represents a statue. A pair of such reliefs flanking the doorway of a small temple would have evoked the grand avenues of sphinxes that traditionally led up to the entrance pylons of larger Egyptian sanctuaries. Here the sphinx is equipped with human arms and hands to enable him to make offerings to his god, the sun disk, Aten, who appears at the upper left. He wears the uraeus of kingship while behind him (to the left) are two cartouches containing his lengthy official name. The sun's life-giving rays end in so many hands, some holding ankh-signs. Below are three offering stands. To the right, Akhenaten as sphinx raises one hand in adoration while in the other he holds a neb sign, a basket signifying lordship, holding Aten's cartouches. These same cartouches appear a third time in the upper right where they are joined with the cartouches of Akhenaten and Queen Nefertiti, who is thus present in name if not in image. The rest of the inscription describes the "great, living Aten" as "dwelling in the Sunshade temple [called] Creator of the Horizon [which is] in Akhetaten." The temple named here, yet to be located, must be the one for which this block was carved. Akhenaten's religious revolution was accompanied by a change in the way pharaoh was depicted, showing a marked departure from the idealized images favored by his predecessors. Even though the king's face has been sadly hacked away, one can still discern his characteristic slanted eyes, long nose,hollow cheeks, drooping lower lip, and pendulous chin.

    Multimedia

  • Stele of Intef and Shenetsetji

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Stele of Intef and Shenetsetji

    about 2130–1980 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Height x width x depth: 48.8 x 53.8 x 12.2 cm (19 3/16 x 21 3/16 x 4 13/16 in.)

    Medium

    Limestone

    Classification

    Architectural elements, Stele

    Accession Number

    25.672

    Collections
    The Ancient World More Info

    Description

    Limestone. Sunk relief, with color preserved on figures. Standing man and wife facing right, with a small group of offerings. The man wears a pointed kilt and three necklaces, and holds a staff and scepter. The woman wears a long, straight dress, collar, and wig without a lappet , and holds her husband's hand. Inscriptions: 1 line at top, 2 cols at R and 1 at L. Text reads "Am offering which [the king] gives, (and) Anubis (and) Osiris, lord of Busiris in all his beautiful places: invocaton offerings of bread and beer for the hereditary noble, count, overseer of the temple and master of secrets of the god's sealer in the at-Hnkt, the venerated Intef. His wife, his beloved, the priestess of Hathor and sole royal ornament,Shenetsetji. Flint nodules. Fair condition.

    Multimedia