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MFA for Educators

Engage your students with the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, to illustrate themes and concepts in any discipline.

Fur, Feathers and Fins

  • Watson and the Shark

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Watson and the Shark

    1778

    John Singleton Copley, American, 1738–1815

    Dimensions

    183.51 x 229.55 cm (72 1/4 x 90 3/8 l

    Medium

    Oil on canvas

    Classification

    Paintings

    Accession Number

    89.481

    Collections
    Americas
    On View
    Saunders Gallery (Copley) - 128 More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Horse

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Horse

    early 8th century A.D.

    Dimensions

    59.05 cm (23 1/4 in.)

    Medium

    Earthenware with three-color glaze

    Classification

    Ceramics, Pottery, Earthenware

    Accession Number

    27.2

    Collections
    Asia
    On View
    Bernat Gallery (Han & Tang China) - 274 More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Bowl

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Bowl

    early 13th century

    Dimensions

    10.2 x 22.5 cm (4 x 8 7/8 in.)

    Medium

    Composite body (quartz, clay, and glass frit) with black pigment under a translucent alkaline glaze

    Classification

    Ceramics

    Accession Number

    65.231

    Collections
    Asia
    On View
    Islamic Gallery - 175 More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Plate

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Plate

    1904–29

    Dedham Pottery, active 1896–1943

    Dimensions

    2.54 x 21.59 x 21.59 cm (1 x 8 1/2 x 8 1/2 in.)

    Medium

    Stoneware (high-fired) with embossed decoration on border, crackle glaze and cobalt blue

    Classification

    Ceramics, Pottery, Stoneware

    Accession Number

    67.1055

    Collections
    Americas More Info

    Description

    Crackle glaze in center with blue painted ducks on the rim. The pattern is the "Duck" (not tufted) pattern, incorporating ducks facing right, ponds, and lily pads.

    Multimedia

  • Boston Common at Twilight

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Boston Common at Twilight

    1885–86

    Childe Hassam, American, 1859–1935

    Dimensions

    106.68 x 152.4 cm (42 x 60 in.)

    Medium

    Oil on canvas

    Classification

    Paintings

    Accession Number

    31.952

    Collections
    Americas
    On View
    Murray Gallery (Amer. Impress.) - 226 More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit

    Slide Notes

    Details

    The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit

    1882

    John Singer Sargent, American, 1856–1925

    Dimensions

    221.93 x 222.57 cm (87 3/8 x 87 5/8 in.)

    Medium

    Oil on canvas

    Classification

    Paintings

    Accession Number

    19.124

    Collections
    Americas
    On View
    Bernard & B.S. Shapiro Gallery (Sargent) - 232 More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Where Do We Come From? What Are We...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?

    1897–98

    Paul Gauguin, French, 1848–1903

    Dimensions

    Image: 139.1 x 374.6 cm (54 3/4 x 147 1/2 in.) Framed: 171.5 x 406.4 x 8.9 cm (67 1/2 x 160 x 3 1/2 in.)

    Medium

    Oil on canvas

    Classification

    Paintings

    Accession Number

    36.270

    Collections
    Europe More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Plate

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Plate

    1896–1929

    Dedham Pottery, active 1896–1943

    Dimensions

    2.54 x 21.59 x 21.59 cm (1 x 8 1/2 x 8 1/2 in.)

    Medium

    Stoneware (high-fired) with embossed (raised) design on border and crackle glaze and cobalt blue

    Classification

    Ceramics, Pottery, Stoneware

    Accession Number

    67.1061

    Collections
    Americas More Info

    Description

    Crackle glaze in center with raised decoration and blue painted turkeys (alternating male and female) and foliage on the rim. The pattern is the "Turkey" pattern.

    Multimedia

  • Ganesha with His Consorts

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Ganesha with His Consorts

    early 11th century

    Dimensions

    Overall (object): 105.1 x 68.6 x 33 cm (41 3/8 x 27 x 13 in.) Overall (including base and wooden skid): 352 kg (776 lb.) Overall (base): 13.2 x 76 x 40.5 cm (5 3/16 x 29 15/16 x 15 15/16 in.) Case (Reinforced wooden pedestal/ three sided outer skirt): 137.2 x 91.4 x 55.9 cm (54 x 36 x 22 in.)

    Medium

    Sandstone

    Classification

    Sculpture

    Accession Number

    1989.312

    Collections
    Asia
    On View
    176 More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • The Fog Warning

    Slide Notes

    Details

    The Fog Warning

    1885

    Winslow Homer, American, 1836–1910

    Dimensions

    76.83 x 123.19 cm (30 1/4 x 48 1/2 in.)

    Medium

    Oil on canvas

    Classification

    Ostraca

    Accession Number

    94.72

    Collections
    Americas
    On View
    Alfond Gallery (Homer, Eakins, Civil War) - 234 More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Eagle

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Eagle

    about 1786–99

    Samuel McIntire, American, 1757–1811

    Dimensions

    Overall: 99.1 x 76.2cm (39 x 30in.) Mount (Carved and painted wooden pedestal): 90.8 x 45.7 x 45.7 cm (35 3/4 x 18 x 18 in.)

    Medium

    Gilt white pine

    Classification

    Sculpture

    Accession Number

    1991.535

    Collections
    Americas
    On View
    Servison Gallery (New Nation, 1815–1830) - 133 More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Macaw

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Macaw

    about 1732

    Meissen Manufactory, Germany

    Dimensions

    Overall: 124.5 cm (49 in.) Weight (estimated): 55 lb. (24.95 kg)

    Medium

    Hard-paste porcelain

    Classification

    Ceramics, Porcelain

    Accession Number

    2006.922

    Collections
    Europe
    On View
    Future AOE Gallery (18th c.) - 142 More Info

    Description

    Naturalistically modeled, perching on a tree stump base, upside down with wings unfurled and beak open.

    Multimedia

  • Figure of a Heron

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Figure of a Heron

    about 1735

    Meissen Manufactory, Germany

    Dimensions

    Overall: 63.5 cm (25 in.) Weight (estimated): 40 lb. (18.14 kg)

    Medium

    Hard-paste porcelain

    Classification

    Ceramics

    Accession Number

    2006.935

    Collections
    Europe
    On View
    Future AOE Gallery (18th c.) - 142 More Info

    Description

    White, naturalistically depicted with a fish in its beak, standing on a base applied with aquatic animals and water weeds

    Multimedia

  • Dragon

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Dragon

    about 1730

    Meissen Manufactory, Germany

    Dimensions

    Overall: 69.9 cm (27 1/2 in.) Weight (estimated): 45 lb. (20.41 kg)

    Medium

    Hard-paste porcelain

    Classification

    Ceramics, Porcelain

    Accession Number

    2000.821

    Collections
    Europe
    On View
    Future AOE Gallery (18th c.) - 142 More Info

    Description

    White ewer formed as a fabulous beast, its jaws wide open and its horn touching its back, a collar of fruit and flowers centered on a mask around its neck, its breast with studded chevrons and its clawed feet vigorously modeled.

    Multimedia

  • The Fish (or The Fish and...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    "The Fish" (or "The Fish and Flowering Branch") window

    about 1890

    John La Farge, American, 1835–1910

    Dimensions

    Overall (no frame/glass only): (26 1/4 x 26 1/2 in.) Framed (w/original wood frame): (30 1/4 x 30 1/4 x 1 1/4 in.) flat frame molding is 1 5/8 in. wide all sides

    Medium

    Leaded stained and opalescent glass

    Classification

    Glass

    Accession Number

    69.1224

    Collections
    Americas
    On View
    Henderson Gallery (Aesthetic Movement) - 228 More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Peacock weathervane

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Peacock weather vane

    about 1860–75

    Dimensions

    Overall: 50.2 x 85.7 cm (19 3/4 x 33 3/4 in.)

    Medium

    Copper; painted gold; iron rod

    Classification

    Sculpture

    Accession Number

    54.1089

    Collections
    Americas
    On View
    Linde Gallery (Am. Folk Art) - 237 More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Desk and bookcase

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Desk and bookcase

    About 1770–85

    George Bright, American, 1726–1805

    Dimensions

    252.7 x 109.2 x 61 cm (99 1/2 x 43 x 24 in.)

    Medium

    Mahogany, white pine, glass

    Classification

    Furniture, Case Furniture and Boxes

    Accession Number

    56.1194

    Collections
    Americas
    On View
    Lynch Gallery (Colonial Boston) - 132 More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Sideboard

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Sideboard

    1850–60

    Ignatius Lutz, American (born in France), 1817–1860

    Dimensions

    Overall: 238.8 x 188 x 63.5 cm (94 x 74 x 25 in.)

    Medium

    Oak, yellow-poplar, marble

    Classification

    Furniture, Case Furniture and Boxes

    Accession Number

    1990.1

    Collections
    Americas
    On View
    Forkner & Gill Family Gallery (Am. Daily) - 238 More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Marine mosaic (central panel of...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Marine mosaic (central panel of three panels from a floor)

    A.D. 200–230

    Dimensions

    Overall: 291.5 x 287 cm (114 3/4 x 113 in.)

    Medium

    Mosaic (stone and glass tesserae)

    Classification

    Mosaics

    Accession Number

    2002.128.1

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    214A More Info

    Description

    Panel B: Central Figural scene; Labeling panels A,B,C follows the orientation of the mosaic in situ from east to west; primary entrance into room is on the east side. Marine scene with three chubby Erotes riding dolphins; they cast fishing lines into the sea filled with 25 fish colorfully depicted against a neutral ground of white. The Erotes face in three directions of the courtyard in which the three part mosaic ensemble was found. Border of red meander and black and yellow crowstep. Glass tesserae (oranges, yellows, reds, yellow-green, dark blue, bright blues, greens).

    Multimedia

  • Mummy of a kitten

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Mummy of a kitten

    30 B.C.–A.D. 200

    Dimensions

    Length x width x depth: 20.5 x 4.5 x 6 cm (8 1/16 x 1 3/4 x 2 3/8 in.)

    Medium

    Linen; organic remains

    Classification

    Organic remains

    Accession Number

    72.4904

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Egyptian Funerary Arts Gallery (Mummies) - 109 More Info

    Description

    Mummy of a kitten, carefully wrapped with eyes and ears molded in linen.

    Multimedia

  • Cat mummy

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Mummy of a cat

    305–30 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Height: 50 cm (19 11/16 in.)

    Medium

    Linen, faunal remains

    Classification

    Organic remains

    Accession Number

    72.4913

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Egyptian Funerary Arts Gallery (Mummies) - 109 More Info

    Description

    This large cat mummy has been prepared with its linen wrappings in an ornate geometric pattern consisting of pane of two-tone rectangles. The head is in somewhat worn condition, but otherwise the mummy in intact.

    Multimedia

  • King Menkaure, the goddess Hathor...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    King Menkaura, the goddess Hathor, and the deified Hare nome

    2490–2472 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Width x height x depth x weight: 43.5 x 84.5 x 49 cm, 187.8 kg (17 1/8 x 33 1/4 x 19 5/16 in., 414.02 lb.) Mount (Steel pallet sits on wooden reinforced pedestal/4-steel clips): 10.2 x 62.5 x 64.8 cm (4 x 24 5/8 x 25 1/2 in.) Case (wooden pedestal): 100.3 x 68.6 x 71.1 cm (39 1/2 x 27 x 28 in.) Block (Plex-bonnet): 105.4 x 64.5 x 67 cm (41 1/2 x 25 3/8 x 26 3/8 in.)

    Medium

    Greywacke

    Classification

    Sculpture

    Accession Number

    09.200

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    G.M. Lane Gallery (Egyptian Old Kingdom) - 207 More Info

    Description

    The sublime beauty of this triple statue masks the sophistication of its composition. The central and largest figure is Hathor, an important goddess throughout Egyptian history associated with fertility, creation, birth, and rebirth. She was the king's divine mother and protector. Here, she wears a headdress of cow's horns and a sun disk, but otherwise her appearance is that of a human female, and she is depicted with the same hairstyle and garment as her earthly counterparts. Hathor embraces King Menkaura, who is standing to her left. He wears a crown symbolic of Upper Egypt (the Nile Valley) and a wraparound kilt whose sharp pleats conform to the outline of his body. In his right hand he holds a mace, a weapon frequently wielded by kings in relief, but until now not reproduced in stone sculpture. Here, artists solved the problem of carving its thin and fragile shaft in the round by resting it on Hathor's throne. In Menkaura's left hand is a short implement with a concave end; it is generally interpreted as a case for documents. Size corresponds to hierarchical position in Egyptian art, and while visually Hathor and Menkaura appear to be the same height, the seated goddess is significantly larger in scale. Like Menkaura's queen in the pair statue (pp. 86-87), Hathor's embrace is one of association, not affection, and all three figures gaze impassively into a distant horizon. The third and smallest figure is a goddess of lesser importance, associated not with the entire country, but with a single district in Upper Egypt known as the Hare nome. It is symbolized by the rabbit standard she wears on her head. An artist has cleverly merged the ankh sign she carries in her left hand with Hathor's throne. The Hare nome goddess, like Hathor and Menkaura, exhibits a body proportioned according to the Old Kingdom ideal of beauty and is modeled with the restrained elegance that makes this period a highpoint of Egyptian art. The inscription on the sculpture's base clarifies the meaning of this complicated piece: "The Horus (Kakhet), King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Menkaura, beloved of Hathor, Mistress of the Sycamore. Recitation: I have given you all good things, all offerings, and all provisions in Upper Egypt, forever." It signifies that all the material goods produced in the Hare nome will be presented to the king to sustain him in perpetuity. One theory suggests that eight such triads, each featuring the king and Hathor with one of the other nome deities, were set up in Menkaura's Valley Temple.

    Multimedia

  • Canopic jar

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Canopic jar

    1295–1070 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Height (lid): 7.7cm (3 1/16in.) Height x width (jar body only): 22.5 x 15.9cm (8 7/8 x 6 1/4in.)

    Medium

    Faience

    Classification

    Tomb equipment, Canopics and Canopic Boxes

    Accession Number

    48.1288a-b

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Egyptian Funerary Arts Gallery (Mummies) - 109 More Info

    Description

    This canopic jar and lid are both made of blue to blue-green faience. The lid is shaped as the head of a baboon, representing Hapy, one of the Four Sons of Horus, protectors of the viscera of the deceased. On the front of the jar is a rectangular panel depicting a scene, painted in black. In the scene the jar's owner (i.e. the deceased) worships the seated god Osiris. The arms of the deceased are raised in a posture of adoration. An offering table is between the two figures, supporting a pot and a lotus. On the shoulder of the jar a design of lotus petals radiates from the jar's mouth. Line details of the facial features and wig of the lid head are also painted in black. This jar and lid are parts of a set comprised of objects 48.1286-48.1289.

    Multimedia

  • Double-sided votive relief

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Double-sided votive relief

    305–30 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Height x width x length: 20.5 x 22.2 x 1.1 cm (8 1/16 x 8 3/4 x 7/16 in.)

    Medium

    Limestone

    Classification

    Sculpture

    Accession Number

    51.2474

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Egyptian Late Period Gallery - 216 More Info

    Description

    Although hundreds of relief plaques have survived from the Ptolemaic Dynasty, few are as fine and interesting as this one, decorated on both sides. The modeling of the cat is unusually bold and almost three-dimensional. Although it is widely regarded as the most Egyptian of animals, the sacred cat was a fairly late development in Egyptian religion, beginning about 1000 B.C., when the female of the species was identified with the goddess Bastet (formerly a lioness). She is ornamented with a necklace of cowrie shells, symbols of fertility, and a pendant in the form of the eye of Horus. The ram-headed deity on the other side may be Khnum, the creator god that formed humankind from Nile clay, Harsaphes, or any of a number of Egyptian ram-gods all represented in the same fashion. He has a triangular depression beneath the chin meant to receive an inlay for a divine beard, and two pairs of long, upward-curving, corkscrew horns. The horns are those of a species that died out in Egypt during the Middle Kingdom (Ovis longipes paleoaegypticus), but they were retained as a symbol of divinity. These corkscrew horns appear to be unfinished. For this reason, plaques like this are often called trial pieces or sculptor’s models, but they are more likely to have been votive offerings in honor of the king or a god.

    Multimedia

  • Bed

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Bed

    about 1800–05

    Thomas Hope, 1769–1831

    Dimensions

    Overall: 137.2 x 123.2 x 243.8 cm (54 x 48 1/2 x 96 in.)

    Medium

    Oak and pine veneered with mahogany and painted black, patinated bronze mounts.

    Classification

    Furniture

    Accession Number

    2003.258

    Collections
    Europe
    On View
    Beal Gallery (Europ. Art 1800-1870) - 251 More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Loincloth of Maiherpra

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Loincloth of Maiherpra

    1479–1425 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Height x width: 85 x 89 cm (33 7/16 x 35 1/16 in.)

    Medium

    Gazelle-skin

    Classification

    Costumes

    Accession Number

    03.1035

    Collections
    The Ancient World More Info

    Description

    Although primarily reserved for kings, the royal valley also sheltered the tombs of especially favored commoners. One of these tombs belonged to the "fanbearer on the king's right" and "child of the inner palace," Maiherpra. These titles indicate that he grew up in the palace and was a personal attendant of the king. Maiherpra's tomb was discovered in 1899 with two sets of coffins, Maiherpra's mummy, and a beautifully illustrated Book of the Dead, all now in Cairo. Three years later, another find was made in a hollow in the rock over the tomb: a small wooden box, painted yellow with hieroglyphic inscriptions in blue paint naming Maiherpra. The box contained two garments, each made of a single gazelle skin. One of these was presented to the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, from which it was later stolen. The other, along with the box, is now in Boston. A remarkable piece of work, the entire gazelle skin (except for the border and a horizontal patch of leather left plain near the top) was made into a fine mesh by cutting it with staggered rows of tiny incisions, about forty to the inch, and then pulling the skin out to expand it. The resulting garment would have been light, breezy, and flexible when worn. This garment was the source of much hopeful speculation when it was presented to the Museum in 1903, as its function was misunderstood. Its shape reminded students of Biblical archaeology of the ephod, described in the Old Testament (Exodus 28: 6- 12) as the ceremonial vestment of the Israelite high priest, and for many years thereafter it was vaunted as the only surviving example. As an ephod, it would have been worn like an apron, just as described in the Bible. But it is unquestionably a loincloth. Leather loincloths are often depicted in New Kingdom tomb paintings, and so we know how they were worn. The top would have been tied around the waist with the patch covering the buttocks, the rounded lower portion pulled up between the legs and tied in front. Most often such loincloths are associated with soldiers and Nubians. Therefore it should come as no surprise that Maiherpra himself was both a soldier and a Nubian: his name means "lion on the battlefield."

    Multimedia

  • Zither (mi-gyaung)

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Zither (mi-gyaung)

    mid-19th century

    Dimensions

    Length 113.8 cm, width 15.6 cm, height 15.9 cm (Length 44 13/16 in., width 6 1/8 in., height 6 1/4 in.)

    Medium

    Tropical hardwood

    Classification

    Musical instruments, Chordophones

    Accession Number

    1993.11

    Collections
    Musical Instruments
    On View
    103D More Info

    Description

    Elongated body of rosewood or huali wood, hollowed out through narrow opening in bottom, running nearly full length. Exterior carved in likeness of a crocodile. Traces of gilding on carved surfaces. Three strings attached at one end to later lateral turned tuning pegs of rosewood and at other end to wicket-shaped piece of brass behind head. Later nut of walnut. Three pairs of long wood plugs (projecting into interior) may mark positions of missing frets. Two additional similar plugs, along center line, near each end of body.

    Multimedia

  • Pictorial tapa

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Pictorial tapa

    mid to late 20th century

    Artist Unidentified, Pacific Islander

    Dimensions

    Overall: 80.3 x 322 cm (31 5/8 x 126 3/4 in.)

    Medium

    Pounded bark cloth with pigment

    Classification

    Textiles

    Accession Number

    2002.788

    Collections
    Africa and Oceania More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Incense burner with Dragon handle...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Incense burner with Dragon handle and Phoenix cover

    3rd century A.D.

    Dimensions

    13.5 x 19 cm (5 5/16 x 7 1/2 in.)

    Medium

    Cast bronze

    Classification

    Metalwork

    Accession Number

    1991.90

    Collections
    Asia
    On View
    176 More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Jar

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Jar

    19th century

    Dimensions

    Height: 43.8 cm (17 1/4 in.), Diameter of Mouth: 14.0 cm (5 1/2 in.), Diameter of Foot: 13.2 cm (5 3/16 in.)

    Medium

    White porcelain with decoration painted with underglaze cobalt-blue and iron-brown

    Classification

    Ceramics, Porcelain

    Accession Number

    50.2236

    Collections
    Asia More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Automedon with the Horses of...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Automedon with the Horses of Achilles

    1868

    Henri Regnault, French, 1843–1871

    Dimensions

    315 x 329 cm (124 x 129 1/2 in.)

    Medium

    Oil on canvas

    Classification

    Paintings

    Accession Number

    90.152

    Collections
    Europe
    On View
    Beal Gallery (Europ. Art 1800-1870) - 251 More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Andiron

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Andiron

    about 1785

    Pierre-Philippe Thomire, French, 1751–1843

    Dimensions

    Height of each andiron: 48.3 cm (19 in.)

    Medium

    Gilt bronze, silver-plated copper plaque decorated with oil-based paint containing Prussian blue pigment

    Classification

    Metalwork

    Accession Number

    27.521.1-2

    Collections
    Europe More Info

    Description

    Pair of andirons. Each comprising two goats with forelegs balancing on central urn and with grapes in their ouths; a thyrsus with pinecone finial extending vertically between them. The base decorated with gilt-bronze relief of cupids and grape vines against an enamel ground.

    Multimedia

  • Figure in the form of a hornbill (...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Figure in the form of a hornbill (porpianong)

    20th century

    Dimensions

    160 cm (63 in.)

    Medium

    Wood, metal and pigment

    Classification

    Sculpture

    Accession Number

    1994.415

    Collections
    Africa and Oceania More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Boar Hunt

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Boar Hunt

    about 1625–30

    Frans Snyders, Flemish, 1579–1657

    Dimensions

    220.6 x 505.1 cm (86 7/8 x 198 7/8 in.)

    Medium

    Oil on canvas

    Classification

    Paintings

    Accession Number

    17.322

    Collections
    Europe
    On View
    Koch Gallery (Europ. Painting 1500-1700) - 250 More Info

    Description

    Multimedia

  • Seated Sekhmet

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Seated Sekhmet

    1390–1352 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Height x width x depth: 126.6 x 53.3 x 66.7 cm (49 13/16 x 21 x 26 1/4 in.)

    Medium

    Granodiorite

    Classification

    Sculpture

    Accession Number

    75.7

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Egyptian Colossal Gallery (Sculpture) - 209 More Info

    Description

    Sekhmet with the head of a lioness seated on square seat, holding ankh in left hand. Inscription of Amenhotep III.

    Multimedia

  • Sarcophagus with triumph of...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Sarcophagus with triumph of Dionysos

    about A.D. 215–225

    Dimensions

    Overall: 77.5 x 208cm (30 1/2 x 81 7/8in.) Other (Body): 59cm (23 1/4in.) Other (lid): 18.5cm (7 5/16in.) Case (Rolling steel pedestal with wooden skirts/plex-bonnet): 77.5 x 228.6 x 76.5 cm (30 1/2 x 90 x 30 1/8 in.)

    Medium

    Marble, from the island of Proconnesus in the Sea of Marmara near Istanbul

    Classification

    Sculpture

    Accession Number

    1972.650

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Classical Roman Gallery - 213 More Info

    Description

    The god of wine and dramatic festivals, in full choral attitude, steps into a biga drawn by two Indian elephants with fringed cloths on their backs. He is supported by his companion the satyr Ampelos and attended by the complete Dionysiac train of Sileni, pans, satyrs, maenads, and the exotic animals of his triumph in India. The inscription reads :M~VIBIO~M~FIL~LIBERALI~PRAET~M~VIBIVS~AGESILAVS~IVNIOR~NVTRICIO~SUO~FEC ("Marcus Vibius Agesilaus junior made (it) for Marcus Vibius Liberalis, son of Marcus, the praetor, his foster-father" ). The condition is, generally speaking, superb, with the small breaks, missing limbs, and absent attributes apparent from illustrations. The surfaces, particularly of the nude or seminude figures, retain their high polish. There are no restorations of the kind that ruin so many sarcophagi. The sections cracked or broken through have been carefully rejoined, and the missing pieces of the lid hardly detract from the visual sweep and rhythm of the triumphal procession. The three-volume corpus of Dionysiac sarcophagi reveals that very few of these monuments of Greek art in the Roman Empire have their original (or any) lids preserved in any form or condition.

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