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MFA for Educators

Engage your students with the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, to illustrate themes and concepts in any discipline.

Ancient Greek Gallery-2018

  • Drinking Cup (Kylix) Depicting an...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Drinking cup (kylix) depicting an athlete with discus

    about 500 B.C.

    Douris

    Dimensions

    Height: 9.5 cm (3 3/4 in.) Diameter: 24 cm (9 7/16 in)

    Medium

    Ceramic, Red Figure

    Classification

    Vessels

    Accession Number

    00.338

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Greek Archaic Gallery - 113 More Info

    Description

    Interior: Youth about to throw diskos. Jumping weights (halteres) hang in the field and a large pickax balances within the tondo behind the athlete. At left is a Greek inscription, "Douris painted it" (DORIS EGRAPHSEN). Exterior side A: Three warriors fighting: middle one wears a sun-hat (petasos). Inscribed in Greek: "Chairestratos is pretty" ([XAI]REST[RA]TOS KALOS). Exterior side B: Three warriors fighting: middle one wears a helmet. Inscribed in Greek: "Chairestratos is pretty" (X[AI]RESTRATO[S] KALOS). Under side of foot has graffiti: letters alpha and upsilon. Condition: Repaired with slight restorations.

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  • Relief from the Temple of Athena...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Architrave block from the Temple of Athena at Assos with facing sphinxes

    about 540–525 B.C.

    Dimensions

    82 x 190 cm (32 5/16 x 74 13/16 in.)

    Medium

    Trachyte

    Classification

    Architectural elements

    Accession Number

    84.68

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    113A More Info

    Description

    Two recumbent sphinxes placed heraldically facing one another occupy the whole face of this block. They are carved in somewhat higher relief than the figures of the block with Pholos, Herakles, and the centaurs (84.67 a and b). In the center between the sphinxes is a small, slender column surmounted by a rudimentary Ionic capital. Each sphinx rests one forepaw on this capital, while the other foreleg is laid along the ground. Their wings curve upward and have rounded tips; their tails are S-shaped, with a tuft at the end. The heads are of a distinctly Archaic type, with receding forehead, prominent nose, small, rounded chin, lips twisted up in a smile, and large eye shown in nearly front view. Their hair is drawn back behind the ears and falls in a thick mass on the neck. The relief has been broken in two, and the upper edge of the left-hand fragment is injured. It is complete at the left end. The missing portion of the block, including the body of the right-hand sphinx, is in the Archaeological Museum at Istanbul. The surfaces are now a crusty brown.

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  • Oil Flask (Aryballos) w/Ajax...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Oil flask (aryballos)

    about 575–550 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Height: 6.3 cm (2 1/2 in.)

    Medium

    Ceramic, Black Figure

    Classification

    Vessels

    Accession Number

    99.514

    Collections
    The Ancient World More Info

    Description

    The heavy body of Ajax is shown slumped over his sword, which he has imbedded in the ground, indicated by a groundline. His torso is shown frontally. Although the sword is shown outside his body, it should be interpreted as having penetrated him, and he is shown after his death as indicated by his limp arms and his hair falling forward. Condition: Colors worn.

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  • Mixing bowl (Volute Krater) w/the...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Mixing bowl (volute krater)

    about 340 B.C.

    the Varrese Painter

    Dimensions

    Height: 124.6 cm (49 1/16 in.); diameter: 56 cm (22 1/16 in.)

    Medium

    Ceramic, Red Figure

    Classification

    Vessels

    Accession Number

    03.804

    Collections
    The Ancient World More Info

    Description

    Connected with the work of the Varrese Painter; it is a possible link between the works of the Gioia del Colle Painter and the Painter of Copenhagen 4223 and those of the Darius Painter. A: The death of Thersites. All the principal figures are labeled with incised inscriptions. Rows of white and yellow dots indicating groundlines run throughout the scene on several levels. Achilles (Greek) and the aged Phoenix (Greek) are shown at the center within the pavilion of Achilles, an airy structure with a pediment, palmette akroteria, and slender, fluted Aeolic capitals. In the center of the pediment is a slender figure with upraised arms, like the kouros-handle of a patera. The side of the pavilion's floor is decorated with a labryinthine maeander and saltire-squares. The row of squares above the architrave resembles a Doric frieze but may represent the ends of the ceiling joists. Achilles is seated on a luxurious kline, his cloak beneath him, holding a spear in his right hand and leaning on a pile of cushions, which, like the mattress and coverlets, are elaborately embroidered. Long ringlets frame the hero's face, drawn in three-quarter view. A sword, presumably that just used to decapitate Thersites (Greek), hangs at his side from a white baldric. Phoenix leans on his staff and holds his head in worry. His himation is pulled up over his head; his legs are crossed. The front of the couch is painted white, perhaps to indicate ivory. Its vine decoration is yellow, as is the broad footstool, decorated with egg-pattern. Two chariot wheels, a pair of greaves, a sword, a shield with a gorgoneion device, and a plumed piloshelmet, all yellow, hang from the ceiling of the pavilion. The decapitated body of Thersides, in shoes and disheveled himation, lies in front of the pavilion. The eyes in the liberated head are shut in death; the grizzled beard shows that Achilles has killed an older man. Other heroes and divinities are on either side. Agamemnon (Greek) approaches from the left, holding a scepter with an eagle finial in his right hand. He wears an embroidered, long-sleeved tunic, embades, and a swirling himation. Agamemnon is followed by the younger Phorbas (Greek), who wears embades, a chlamys, and a yellow pilos, and rests a spear on his left shoulder. To the right, Diomedes (Greek), the cousin of Thersites, wearing a chlamys and a white pilos, rushes up to avenge his kinsman. He is accompanied by an Aetolian warrior (Greek) with a spear, sword baldric, and yellow shield. Diomedes starts to draw his sword, but is restrained by Menelaos (Greek). Menelaos wears a chlamys and has a sword slung at his left side. In the upper tier are four figures. At the left of the pavilion are Pan (Greek) and a seated, winged figure like a Fury, labeled (Greek) (Vengeance). The Fury wears an embroidered chiton with a white belt, crossed bandoleers, tall boots, and a necklace. White snakes twine in her hair. Her face is in three-quarter view. In her right hand she holds a sword; in her left, a scabbard and spear. Pan is leaning against a tree, a spotted animal skin over his shoulders and a wreath on his horned head. He holds his yellow-brown pedum in his right hand. In the field above is a rosette. To the right of the building Athena (Greek) sits on a round, yellow shield, wearing chiton, himation, yellow shoes, and white diadem, aegis, bracelets, earrings, and necklace. In front of her, Hermes (Greek) stands with his legs crossed, wearing winged shoes, chlamys, and wreath. He carries his yellow caduceus and petasos in his left hand and a tall branch with a pendant fillet in his right. At the lower left, the helmeted Automedon, wearing a chlamys, kneels with a shield on his left arm and a spear in his right hand, as if guarding the mutilated Thersites. In the foreground and around Automedon (Greek) and the dead man are objects testifying to the violent action: a broken lustral basin, a tripod, a staff, a footbath, and a variety of metal vases, including two phialai, a kantharos, an oinochoe, and a volute-krater. To the right, a slave or commoner (Greek), wearing boots and a cloak over his left arm, runs off in horror. Many of the larger yellow objects, like shields are toned so that more of the white underpainting shows through at either the forward or upper edge to suggest the play of light. As told in the "Aethiopis", Thersites was slain in a fit of temper by Achilles, for teasing him about his ill-fated love for the Amazon queen Penthesilea. The Greeks were angry and divided as a result of this brutal act, and Achilles had to sail to Lesbos and sacrifice to Apollo in order to appease his fellow leaders and warriors. The reaction of the character labeled Demos may allude to the revulsion among "hoi polloi". The emotions aroused are well portrayed by the painter, who represented the anger of Agamemnon, the chagrin of Phoenix, the anguish of Diomedes, and the haughty nonchalance of Achilles. It is interesting that the Fury Poina, a character who turns up in several Apulian mythological scenes where bad business is at hand (cat. no. 42), has her sword drawn; in this context, she must represent the slashing vengeance of Achilles, the personification of his wrath. Trendall and Webster ("Illustrations", pp. 106-107) suggest the scene may be based on the "Achilles Thersitoktonos" of Chaeremon, a fourth-century dramatist; this may be correct, but if so, the vase-painter has enlarged and elaborated on the stage version, with more protagonists than would be in any single scene. B. A young man in a chlamys and holding a spear in his left hand stands beside a horse within a white-painted naiskos with a pediment and palmette akroteria. The naiskos has an elaborately decorated plinth (maeanders, lesbian cymatium, key-pattern, scrolling rendrils). There are three figures on either side, in two registers. At left, a seated woman with a phiale is offered a wreath by a wreathed youth leaning on a staff. Below them, a woman runs to the right with a yellow "xylophone" and a basket of offerings. On the right, a wreathed youth seated on his cloak and holding a staff and phiale faces a woman with a wreath in her left hand and a branch in her right. Below them, a wreathed youth with a basket of offerings in his left hand leans on his staff. He holds a flower in his right hand and has shoes and a cloak. All three women wear shoes, chiton, kekryphalos, earrings, bracelets, and necklace. Among the offerings in the baskets are alabastra painted yellow and white. Fillets and rosettes float in the upper field. The similarity between the pavilion of Achilles on the obverse and the funerary naiskos on the reverse invites comparison between the dead horseman and the greatest of Greek heroes. Achilles was the very embodiment of "arete", and that is the quality celebrated by the youth's monument. He has joined the heroic dead and, like Odysseus, will see Achilles and the other Homeric heroes in the Underworld. For horsemen as heroes, and demigods, seee A. Cermanovic-Kuzmanovic et. al., "LIMC", VI, 1, pp. 1019-1081, especially p. 1025; VI, 2, pls. 673-719. On the obverse neck, in three-quarter view to the left, is the quadriga of Helios, surrounded by a white, yellow, and red nimbus. The god holds a whip in his right hand and is dressed in a long chiton. His presence is an appropriate symbol of renewal and re-birth on a funerary vase; if he is to be associated with the scene below, it may mean that the action there takes place in the morning, with the first rays of the sun revealing the body of the murdered man. On the reverse neck, Eros is seated on a flower, wearing bracelets, shoes, anklets, necklace, and sakkos; he holds a phiale in his left hand. Elaborate floral ornament and scrolling tendrils, high lighted with added white and yellow, surround both Helios and Eros. The composition with Eros recalls similar scenes on vases of the Alabastra Group and others associated with it; see "RVAp", II, pls. 232 (5 and 8) and 233 (1-3). For the floral ornament, see the comments on cat. no. 21. There are two registers of elaborate palmettes under the handles. The latter have plastic female masks on the volutes and black swan's heads on the shoulders. Springs of white laurel decorate the obverse handle flanges. A wreath of grape leaves and clusters runs around the foot. Above both pictures is a double band of egg-pattern. A band consisting of groups of stopt maeanders to left alternating with cross-squares circles the lower body. A band of egg-pattern circles the lip. Below the obverse lip are an ivy vine, a yellow bead-and-reel molding, and a laurel wreath with a central rosette. Below the reverse lip are a laurel wreath, a row of dots, and a band of rosettes. Excerpted from Padgett, ITALIAN VASE PAINTING in ITALY, #38

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  • Bathing Vessel (loutrophoros) with...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Bathing vessel (loutrophoros) depicting a bridal procession

    450–425 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Height: 75.3 cm (29 5/8 in.); Diameter of lip: 25.3 cm (9 15/16 in.); Diameter of body: 18 cm (7 1/16 in.)

    Medium

    Ceramic, Red Figure

    Classification

    Vessels

    Accession Number

    03.802

    Collections
    The Ancient World More Info

    Description

    Side A: Bridal procession. Young man leads bride to his house, grasping her by the hand. Two Erotes fly on either side of the bride. Behind the bride is a nympheutria, supervisor of the wedding, who adjusts the bride's veil. The mother of the groom appears in the doorway of the home bearing two torches. An Eros flies out of the bridal chamber. Other female figures are present. Side B: A young man clasps the hand of his father-in-law in agreement of the engagement. On each side of the vase's neck is a draped woman.

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  • Sphinx from a Grave Monument

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Upper part of a grave stele: seated sphinx (sphinx and capital)

    about 530 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Height: 141.7 cm (55 13/16 in.)

    Medium

    Marble, either island (sphinx and plinth) or Pentelic (capital)

    Classification

    Sculpture

    Accession Number

    40.576

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Greek Archaic Gallery - 113 More Info

    Description

    Sphinx and plinth were carved in island marble separately from the Pentelic marble capital. This plinth was let into a socket at the top of the capital and secured in a bed of molten lead. There is a large socket on the underside of the capital, with a pour hole from the back side. The abacus and the base of the capital are flush with the volutes, and all surfaces have been smoothed, except the plinth of the sphinx, which shows point or punch marks. The sphinx crouches to the right, with hind-quarters lifted and head turned to the front. The end of her curving tail rests on her right haunch. The hair, originally black, is shown as a mass descending to the shoulders and divided vertically and horizontally by grooves. The feathers of the wings are carved in relief and were painted alternately green, black, red, and blue. The feathers on the breast form a scale pattern, painted in alternate rows of red and green. The rib of each wing and the flat molding at the top of each foreleg are green. The capital is of lyre design, consisting of two double volutes, with palmettes in all the interstices. It is open in the center and richly decorated with incised and painted designs. The front and ends of the base are enriched with a delicately carved guilloche. The abacus has four-pointed stars set on three-petaled palmettes, three in front and one on each end. The outer sides of the volutes are incised and painted with a large lotus and palmette pattern. Alternating red and black colors complement the form, carving and incision. Sphinx and capital have been broken into a number of pieces and rejoined, with slight restorations at the joins. There is more restoration in the lower part of the capital than elsewhere, but this is to a great extent supplanted by an extra piece acquired nearly twenty years after the original purchase was first undertaken. The surfaces are very fresh. The fragments with the parts of the dedicatory inscription have the handsome golden yellow patina of the best Pentelic marble. See: 40.724a-b for inscribed fragments. See also Cls. Inv. 186. Nov. 2012: please note that Cls. Inv. 186 is actually 40.724b.

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  • Head of Polyphemos

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Head of Polyphemos

    about 150 B.C. or later

    Dimensions

    Height: 38.3 cm (15 1/16 in.)

    Medium

    Marble, Dolomitic from the Greek island of Thasos

    Classification

    Sculpture

    Accession Number

    63.120

    Collections
    The Ancient World More Info

    Description

    This head comes from a group, probably of the blinding of Polyphemos, similar to that constructed from fragments found in the grotto at Sperlonga, along the Italian coast southwest of Rome. Polyphemos is based, in details of hair and beard, on a Pergamene centaur. The sculptor was wise in rejecting the older tradition, one seen in Hellenistic terracottas, of showing the monstrous giant as a kind of fat-faced baboon, with large ears and his eye set like a beacon light in the middle of his forehead. Here the rugged, animal power of the creature has been stressed. Broken off through the neck and the lower whiskers, the head is in relatively excellent condition, save for the damage to the beard below the mouth. The marble has a yellow-buff tone. This is the head of the one-eyed, man-eating Cyclops whom Odysseus finally outwitted and blinded. Here the monster is in a peaceful mood, either waiting to receive the cup of wine offered him by Odysseus, or, more likely, gazing love-struck at the indifferent sea nymph Galatea. The head comes from a sculptural group that might have adorned a public fountain or a luxurious seaside villa. The type originated in the second century B.C., yet the lively and direct style of this piece makes difficult to judge whether it is a contemporary variant or a Roman copy. Scientific Analysis: Marble has been scientifically tested with X-Ray Diffraction and determined to be Dolomitic. Harvard Lab No. HI363: Isotope ratios - delta13C +3.85 / delta18O -3.03, Attribution - Thasos-Cape Vathy, Justification - Dolomitic by XRD.

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  • Corinthian Helmet

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Corinthian helmet

    650–625 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Height: 22 cm (8 11/16 in.)

    Medium

    Bronze

    Classification

    Warfare, hunting, & fishing, Armor

    Accession Number

    98.664

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Greek Archaic Gallery - 113 More Info

    Description

    Little pins show that this helmet, of Corinthian type, was lined with leather. There are no visible signs of attachment for a crest. The bowl has been broken through, apparently by blows; there is a round hole in the back of the neck. Dark green patina. The helmet is the Corinthian type with angles at the sides.

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  • Large Basin w/Wrestlers on Rim

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Large basin with wrestlers on its rim

    early-5th century B.C.

    Dimensions

    Height: 28 cm (11 in.); diameter: 72 cm (28 3/8 in.)

    Medium

    Bronze

    Classification

    Vessels

    Accession Number

    03.999

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Greek Archaic Gallery - 113 More Info

    Description

    The basin has a plain, slightly flaring foot with bead and ovolo molding on the rim. There are two swinging handles with palmettes below, and two handles formed by pairs of wrestlers, standing on volutes, floral stems and leaves leading to palmettes. The wrestling youths have late archaic faces and hair arranged like that of kouroi in the late sixth century. Similar vessels were found in tombs in Picene district of Italy and were probably imported from workshops in Laconia or in southern Italy. Condition: Numerous fragments of the bowl are missing. The rim is broken in several places and has been strengthened in modern times by a narrow strip of metal on the interior, fastened by rivets. The body is also reinforced by sheets of metal in the interior. All four handles have been refastened in modern times. Crusty green patina with hard surfaces and in various shades.

    Multimedia

  • Mantiklos "Apollo"

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Mantiklos "Apollo"

    about 700–675 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Height: 20.3 cm (8 in.)

    Medium

    Bronze

    Classification

    Sculpture

    Accession Number

    03.997

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Greek Archaic Gallery - 113 More Info

    Description

    A votive statuette of Apollo evidenced by the inscription on the front of the thighs of this standing nude male figure; inscribed in archaic Boeotian characters "Mantiklos donated me as a tithe to the far shooter, the bearer of the Silver Bow. You, Phoebus (Apollo) give something pleasing in return." There are marks of attachment on the top of the head and a hole for attachment in the forehead. The hole in the left hand has been identified as support for a bow. It has been suggested also that the figure was a warrior, wearing a helmet and carrying a spear in the left hand and a shield on the right arm.

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  • Cinerary Urn

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Cinerary urn

    2nd century B.C.

    Dimensions

    27 x 16.5 x 42 cm (10 5/8 x 6 1/2 x 16 9/16 in.); including cover 58 x 22 x 43 cm (22 13/16 x 8 7/8 x 16 15/16 inches)

    Medium

    Terracotta

    Classification

    Tomb equipment, Coffins, Sarcophagi

    Accession Number

    22.594

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Etruscan Gallery - 117 More Info

    Description

    On the front of the urn a battle scene. On the cover, reclining figure of a youth holding a phiale. Slight remains of the painted inscription.

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  • Head of a Statue of Dionysos

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Head of a statue of Dionysos

    150–50 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Height: 13 cm (5 1/8 in.)

    Medium

    Bronze, silver

    Classification

    Sculpture

    Accession Number

    24.957

    Collections
    The Ancient World More Info

    Description

    Although the modeling of the two faces differs, this and another bronze head doubtless form a pair. They were cast by means of the lost wax method in two pieces, soldered together at the area of the diadem. This technique provided for the easy application of the eye inlays from the inside out. The gap at the neck fitting, appearing right-angled in profile view, allowed for the attachment of the heads to statues whose height can be reconstructed to about 75 centimeters. Several elements clearly identify them as representations of the Greek god Dionysos: the locks of the hair gathered in braids, the floral diadem over the brow, the headband (of red copper with silver inlays), and the full, youthful facial features. According to C. Vermeule, the statue type may be traced to the work of Praxiteles. Owing to the existence of two such heads, it is doubtful that they were intended to stand alone as separate statues. More likely they stood together in a functional context that required a statue pair. They probably served as lamp stands, part of the valuable, imported luxury goods decorating the royal palace. (Sudan catalogue)

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  • Libation Bowl

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Libation bowl (phiale mesomphalos)

    about 625–600 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Height: 15 cm (5 7/8 in.); diameter: 15 cm (5 7/8 in.); weight: 835.46 grams (29 1/2 oz.)

    Medium

    Gold

    Classification

    Vessels

    Accession Number

    21.1843

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Greek Archaic Gallery - 113 More Info

    Description

    One of the earliest surviving examples of a phiale in precious metal and a rare example in gold, this vesselis simply decorated, segmented into nine lobes and embellished with bands of beading on parts of the interior. On the exterior, just below the rim, an incised inscription in archaic Corinthian dialect reads: "The sons of Kypselos dedicated [this bowl] from Heraklea."

    Multimedia

  • Two-Handled Jar (amphora) w/...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Two-handled jar (amphora)

    about 540–530 B.C.

    Exekias

    Dimensions

    Height: 51.4 cm (20 1/4 in.); diamater: 33 cm (13 in.)

    Medium

    Ceramic, Black Figure

    Classification

    Vessels

    Accession Number

    63.952

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Greek Archaic Gallery - 113 More Info

    Description

    Side A: The Dioskouroi harness a biga. Helen stands at the left, raising her left hand in a gesture of farewell. The Greek inscription 'Helene' (HELENE) above her head. Polydeukes steadies the chariot with his left foot. Behind his head and back the inscription 'Polydeuces' ([P]OLYDEUKES) in retrograde. Kastor wears a long white robe. Inscription above his head, 'Kastor' (KASTOR). A groom, Aischines, holds Simos, the off-horse. The inscription 'Aischines' (ASCHINES) above the figure's head, and the Greek inscription 'Simos' (SIMOS) underneath the horse's head. A second groom, Eurylochos, holds the near-horse. To the left of his legs the inscription in retrograde 'Eurylochos' (EURYLOCHOS). Inscription ([?]IOS) above the horse's head that is probably part of its name. To the left of the horse's front legs, the inscription 'Kason is handsome' (KAS^ON KAL^OS) in retrograde. Side B: Dionysos, ivy-wreathed and seated on a folding stool, drinks from a kantharos in the midst of a grapevine populated with twelve diminutive satyrs. Inscription above and to the right of his head, 'Dionysos' (DIONYSOS).

    Multimedia

  • Oil Flask (Lekythos) w/a Warrior...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Oil flask (lekythos)

    about 490 B.C.

    the Diosphos Painter

    Dimensions

    26.1 cm (10 1/4 in.)

    Medium

    Ceramic, Black Figure

    Classification

    Vessels

    Accession Number

    99.528

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Greek Archaic Gallery - 113 More Info

    Description

    A young warrior, nude except for a high helmet and greaves, leads a horse to right. The warrior is painted with black glaze on a white ground, and the white horse is rendered with an outline. Meaningless inscriptions appear between the heads of the warrior and the horse, between the warrior's legs, under the horse's tail, and under the horse's belly. These are mock inscriptions that are used when "the artist's literacy failed or no proper names were required" (Boardman, Athenian Black Figure Vases, p. 200) The figures appear between large palmette motifs. Condition: Slightly restored.

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  • Muse Playing a Kithara

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Muse playing a kithara

    1st century A.D.

    Dimensions

    32.3 cm (12 11/16 in.)

    Medium

    Terracotta

    Classification

    Sculpture

    Accession Number

    87.390

    Collections
    The Ancient World More Info

    Description

    Statuette of standing draped Muse who holds her arms in a position of playing a kithara. She is standing on the right leg and having her left to the front and side. She is wearing a chiton, which is fastened with a button on her right shoulder and over that an himation, which is wrapped around her body and left upper arm, leaving her right breast free. Her hair is arranged in three rows of curls around her face and hangs down her neck. It is not worked behind. She wears a crown (stephane) decorated with a lotus and palmette design in relief; she has earrings in her ears and she is wearing thick-soled forked sandals. She stands on a low base. The fingers of the left are missing and so are all of the fingers of the right hand but the thumb; also missing parts of the side curls. Traces of cream on flesh, reddish-brown on hair, black on stephane and button, pink and red on himation. Light-reddish yellow clay.

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  • Strainer

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Strainer

    about 4th–3rd century B.C.

    Dimensions

    Length: 29.6 cm (11 5/8 in.)

    Medium

    Bronze

    Classification

    Tools & equipment, Household

    Accession Number

    99.498

    Collections
    The Ancient World More Info

    Description

    The bowl has a flat rim and is perforated with many small holes. There is also a flat handle, and a hook-shaped projection from the opposite side. Bluish patina.

    Multimedia

  • Mirror and Handle w/Winged Couple

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Mirror and handle with winged couple

    about 450 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Length: 37.8 cm (14 7/8 in.)

    Medium

    Bronze

    Classification

    Tools & equipment, Cosmetic and Medical

    Accession Number

    96.716

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Greek Archaic Gallery - 113 More Info

    Description

    The handle of the mirror takes the form of a winged youth and a winged maiden playing an unidentified finger game. Rough dark and light green patina, with areas of blue.

    Multimedia

  • Jointed Doll: Figurine w/Moveable...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Jointed doll

    about 4th–5th century B.C.

    Dimensions

    26.2 cm (10 5/16 in.)

    Medium

    Terracotta

    Classification

    Sculpture

    Accession Number

    01.7883

    Collections
    The Ancient World More Info

    Description

    Jointed doll holding krotali in each hand; part of those in left hand are gone. The figure is split down each side.

    Multimedia

  • Tetradrachem of Amphipolis w/Head...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Tetradrachm of Amphipolis with head of Apollo

    about 356–355 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Diameter: 25 mm. Weight: 14.35 gm.

    Medium

    Silver

    Classification

    Numismatics, Coins

    Accession Number

    11.1774

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    212C More Info

    Description

    Obverse: Head of Apollo facing three-quarters right in laurel wreath; hair in heavy mass over forehead. Reverse: Race torch, flame to left, within raised convex square frame on which inscription is written in Attic form of Greek; in right field, an ear of grain; square incuse. (See media screen for Greek inscription)

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  • Stater of Poseidonia w/Poseidon...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Stater of Poseidonia with Poseidon hurling trident

    about 530–500 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Diameter: 27 mm. Weight: 7.49 gm.

    Medium

    Silver

    Classification

    Numismatics, Coins

    Accession Number

    04.352

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    212C More Info

    Description

    Obverse: Poseidon striding right, upper body in front view, hurling trident in raised right hand, left hand outstretched; nude, with chlamys over back falling from arms; bearded, hair long, turned up at back, two locks falling on breast; ground line; border of dots. Inscription in Greek. Reverse: Poseidon to left, incuse except for trident; partly in rear view; hair in long locks; striated incuse border. Inscription in Greek.

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  • Tetradrachem of Athens w/Head of...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Tetradrachm of Athens with head of Athena

    about 490–485 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Diameter: 22 mm. Weight: 16.23 gm.

    Medium

    Silver

    Classification

    Numismatics, Coins

    Accession Number

    10.244

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    212C More Info

    Description

    Obverse: Head of Athena to right, wearing disk earring and helmet. Helmet adorned with four pellets. Reverse: Owl to right, head facing. Twig with leaves and berry at left; inscription in Greek at right.

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  • Bucket (Situla) w/Double Handles

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Bucket (situla) with double handles

    about 350–300 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Height: 26.8 cm (10 9/16 in.)

    Medium

    Bronze

    Classification

    Vessels

    Accession Number

    03.1001

    Collections
    The Ancient World More Info

    Description

    The situla has a frieze of repoussé designs between beading, wreath and thin fillet above, rosettes below. A.: Young Dionysos caresses a panther at the left. Behind comes a satyr with a kantharos. At the right, a dancing maenad. B.: Seated woman (Ariadne?). To the right were a panther and a maenad. At the left, a dancing satyr. The two bails (handles) are hooked into a double, palmette ring over the center of each side; these handles lie flat along the rim. The bottom and half the body of the pail are missing. Scene B is fragmentary. Dark to medium green patina, with corrosion.

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  • Woman in Long Chiton Dancing

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Woman in long chiton dancing

    3rd or 2nd century B.C.

    Dimensions

    22.7 cm (8 15/16 in.)

    Medium

    Terracotta

    Classification

    Sculpture

    Accession Number

    01.7714

    Collections
    The Ancient World More Info

    Description

    Statuette of a draped woman. She is standing with her left leg stepped forward. Her arms are extended to the left; she looks like she is dancing. She is dressed in a long chiton, with overfold open down to the right side and fastened on the left shoulder with a button. She has her hair tied behind and arranged in a row of curls above her forehead; she is wearing a crown (stephane) and earrings. This figure is dressed and posed as the group of flying Nikai from Myrina, but she doesn't have any wings. She has a hang-hole on the back for suspension. Missing: feet, end of thumb, first two fingers and end of little fingers of left hand; first and fourth fingers of right hand. Traces of black on stephane. Red clay.

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  • Mirror Stand

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Mirror stand

    about 490 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Height: 22.4 cm (8 13/16 in.)

    Medium

    Bronze

    Classification

    Tools & equipment, Cosmetic and Medical

    Accession Number

    01.7483

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    Greek Archaic Gallery - 113 More Info

    Description

    Caryatid Mirror Stand in the form of a female (Aphrodite?) who stands on a concave base. She wears an Ionic chiton with concealed belt. She holds the edge of her garment in the left hand and raises a small round object in her right hand (an apple?). A fillet or diadem around her crown is enriched with three floral rosettes. The diadem forms a transition to the attachment for the mirror springing out of the top of the head. The mirror was attached to the support ending in tendrils with a paddle-shaped brace. Scholars attribute this stand to an Attic workshop Caryatid mirror stands developed in Greece may be derived from Egyptian or Near Eastern prototypes. Condition: Dark green patina, with some light green and cleaned corrosion.

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  • Lion's Head from The Sima of...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Lion's head from the sima of the Temple at Assos

    about 525 B.C.

    Dimensions

    26.7 cm (10 1/2 in.)

    Medium

    Tufa, so-called (local volcanic stone)

    Classification

    Architectural elements

    Accession Number

    84.71

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    113A More Info

    Description

    This is one of the four lion's heads that decorated the corners of the gable sima of the temple. The local volcanic stone is lighter and softer than the trachyte used for the temple as a whole; the material was consequently more suitable for sculpture. The animal was represented in the usual manner with staring eyes and widely opened jaws. Eyes were forward. Nothing remains of the mane except its border along the forehead. Three of the teeth on the left side are well preserved. The lower jaw, the upper part of the right side, and most of the right ear are missing. The surface is considerably worn.

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  • Fillet: Headband Decorated w/Four...

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Fillet

    Dimensions

    24 cm (9 7/16 in.)

    Medium

    Electrum

    Classification

    Jewelry / Adornment

    Accession Number

    99.436

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    113A More Info

    Description

    Double border of dots stamped around sdge; four groups of two holes each in middle. From Kameiros.

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  • Larnax: Burial Coffin w/Lid

    Slide Notes

    Details

    Chest-shaped coffin (larnax) with lid

    about 1350–1300 B.C.

    Dimensions

    Overall: 86.3 x 40.6 x 122 cm (34 x 16 x 48 1/16 in.)

    Medium

    Painted terracotta

    Classification

    Tomb equipment, Coffins, Sarcophagi

    Accession Number

    2011.319a-b

    Collections
    The Ancient World
    On View
    113A More Info

    Description

    A rectangular chest with orange-brown decoration, one side with three large papyrus plants with two smaller papyrus plants between, the other side with two large papyrus plants and a column of shell motifs between, both sides bordered by vertical wavy lines, one short end with two columns each with three bands of wavy lines, the other end with vertical column of spirals and interlocking "S"-motifs bordered by vertical and wavy lines, the gabled lid with shell motifs on each side, one short end with two spirals, the other with papyrus, the top of the lid with ridge painted with a wavy line, columns and pairs of circular holes pierced through the sides, lid and base, one short leg reattached, lid repaired, three legs missing. One original leg reattached and three replaced in plaster.

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